1. From Cajzoran Ali’s The Divine Posture Influence Upon Endocrine Glands, 1928. American “self-taught” Hatha-Yogin, occultist, Christian eschatologist… 

    From Cajzoran Ali’s The Divine Posture Influence Upon Endocrine Glands, 1928. American “self-taught” Hatha-Yogin, occultist, Christian eschatologist… 

  2. God-damn the Italian avant-garde, it does it to me every time. 

  3. Giacinto Scelsi, Pranam II (1973)

  4. karaj:

karaj:

this is obviously one of the most importantly named books ever and let it be a guide to us in our lives and in our writing. as susan mcclary says of madonna’s feminine ending in “live to tell,” “…she sets up residence on the moments of the harmonic context that fluctuate between desire and dread on the one hand and resolution on the other. rather than deciding for the sake of secure identity (a move that would lapse back into the narrative of masculine subjectivity), she inhabits both and thus refuses closure.”
refusing closure, secure identities, and masculine subjectivity forever. 
but also: so much historical laughter over sentences like “madonna is engaged in rewriting some very fundamental levels of western thought.” plus mcclary keeps talking really extensively about tawny kitaen and i am torn between reading the book and watching whitesnake videos, because i think as a performance studies phd my stipend supports either/both. omg, tawny. i just want to do bad balletic gymnastics on a car but i really need to read this book. (“excess and frame: the musical representation of madwomen.” chapter 4.) 

the theoretical underpinnings. 


“Before we can address the questions concerning gender and sexuality discussed above, it is necessary to construct an entire theory of musical signification.” Must a discussion of music, gender, and sexuality be based on a universalizing theory of musical signification, from the point of view of someone who has been “immersed in musical ‘high culture’ for 44 years” (p.21)?The hermeneutic instinct in this book doesn’t age well - as she addresses in the new introduction, ten years later. But still, even arguments about Madonna that rely on a casual, implicit semiotic link between certain harmonic structures and certain states of desire bears the mark of a cultural hegemony/academic power dynamic that privileges “analysis” over experience - one of the main problems within the discipline of music theory. I think Ruth Solie writes really convincingly about this tension in the intro to “Musicology and Difference”— pointing out that there is still power at play in such hermeneutic interpretations of musical experience, musical “text”. 

    karaj:

    karaj:

    this is obviously one of the most importantly named books ever and let it be a guide to us in our lives and in our writing. as susan mcclary says of madonna’s feminine ending in “live to tell,” “…she sets up residence on the moments of the harmonic context that fluctuate between desire and dread on the one hand and resolution on the other. rather than deciding for the sake of secure identity (a move that would lapse back into the narrative of masculine subjectivity), she inhabits both and thus refuses closure.”

    refusing closure, secure identities, and masculine subjectivity forever. 

    but also: so much historical laughter over sentences like “madonna is engaged in rewriting some very fundamental levels of western thought.” plus mcclary keeps talking really extensively about tawny kitaen and i am torn between reading the book and watching whitesnake videos, because i think as a performance studies phd my stipend supports either/both. omg, tawny. i just want to do bad balletic gymnastics on a car but i really need to read this book. (“excess and frame: the musical representation of madwomen.” chapter 4.) 

    the theoretical underpinnings. 

    “Before we can address the questions concerning gender and sexuality discussed above, it is necessary to construct an entire theory of musical signification.”

    Must a discussion of music, gender, and sexuality be based on a universalizing theory of musical signification, from the point of view of someone who has been “immersed in musical ‘high culture’ for 44 years” (p.21)?

    The hermeneutic instinct in this book doesn’t age well - as she addresses in the new introduction, ten years later. But still, even arguments about Madonna that rely on a casual, implicit semiotic link between certain harmonic structures and certain states of desire bears the mark of a cultural hegemony/academic power dynamic that privileges “analysis” over experience - one of the main problems within the discipline of music theory. I think Ruth Solie writes really convincingly about this tension in the intro to “Musicology and Difference”— pointing out that there is still power at play in such hermeneutic interpretations of musical experience, musical “text”. 

  5. Hector Berlioz, steampunk (and anticipator of the YouTube Symphony Orchestra by about 150 years)

    Hector Berlioz, steampunk (and anticipator of the YouTube Symphony Orchestra by about 150 years)

  6. "Tears in Heaven" 

    "Tears in Heaven" 

  7. Behind the Mask, YMO (1980)

  8. Thousand Knives, Ryuichi Sakamoto (1978)

  9. John Chowning, Stria (1977)